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Protect your restaurant from a kitchen grease fire

One of the biggest threats to restaurant and bar owners is fire, which can be a costly and potentially business-ending disaster.

Grease accumulation, equipment malfunction and general poor housekeeping are all potential hazards.

From 2006 to 2010, an estimated average of 7,640 structure fires in restaurants and bars were reported to U.S. fire departments each year.

Associated average annual losses included two civilian deaths per year, 115 civilian injuries and $246 million in property loss, according to the National Fire Protection Agency.

Although 71 percent of restaurant and bar fires remain relatively small, they are no less damaging to business owners.

Loss of revenue, stress on staff and the cost of repairs make bouncing back an expensive task.

On top of this, owners run the risk of losing customers to competitors when “Closed” signs hang in the windows.

Preparation can make or break a business.

Almost all commercial cooking generates grease, which is a huge fire hazard to its highly combustible nature.

Because of this, there is really no way to completely erase the threat of fire.

However, there are precautions you can take to decrease the likelihood of a potentially catastrophic event.

Proper duct and hood cleaning.

Exhaust hoods and ducts are designed to collect cooking vapors and residues. Poorly cleaned kitchen hoods and ducts account for 21 percent of all fires.

The National Fire Protection Association’s fire code NFPA 96 prescribes the minimum fire safety guidelines for cooking equipment.

Kitchen exhaust hoods, grease removal devices, exhaust duct-work and all other components involved in the capture, containment and control of grease-laden cooking residue.

The NFPA 96 standards are considered necessary to offer an proper level of protection against damage to property and loss of life.

Restaurant owners must install a UL300-approved automatic fixed fire suppression system.

To protect their ducts, grease removal systems, hoods and commercial cooking equipment such as deep fat fryers, woks, ranges, griddles and broilers.

This system must be serviced every six months.

In addition to complying with fire, health and building codes, a professionally installed kitchen exhaust hood system helps keep up a clean, safe environment.

Commercial cooking generates grease-laden air and other pollutants. An adequately designed kitchen exhaust system is vital to maintaining good airflow.

Kitchen hoods should be made of and supported by steel or stainless that meets minimum thickness requirements.

Other approved materials of equal strength and fire corrosion resistance may also be used.

NFPA 96 recommends that kitchen hood and duct cleaning frequency be based on an individual restaurant or bar’s cooking volume:

Monthly – For systems serving solid fuel cooking operations

Quarterly – For systems with high-volume cooking operations such as 24-hour cooking, charbroiling or wok cooking operations

Semi-annually – For systems serving moderate-volume cooking operations

Annually – For systems serving low-volume cooking

Grease filters are the first line of removal for grease-laden vapors.

Clean filters improve ventilation and cut the fire hazard significantly. Filters should be cleaned on a weekly basis for moderate- to high-volume cooking operations.

Empowering employees.

Employee fire safety and response training should include a fire prevention plan and an emergency action plan.

Is a powerful defense against fire threats and can mean the difference between a localized fire and an uncontrolled blaze.

Fire prevention plan.

In addition to basic fire training and an action plan, hands on training can offer a better understanding of fighting fires.

Employees should also be familiar with personal protective equipment and fire evacuation routes and should have real training in using a fire extinguisher.

A basic fire prevention plan should include.

A list of all major fire hazards, proper handling and storage rules for hazardous materials, and potential ignition sources.

Procedures to control the accumulation of flammable and combustible waste material. Procedures for regular maintenance of safeguards installed on heat-producing equipment.

Names or job titles of employees responsible for maintaining equipment

Emergency action plan.

A well-developed emergency action plan should give employees with basic training on what to do in the event of a fire.

Employers should check the emergency action plan:

When the plan is developed, when the employee’s responsibilities or designated actions under the plan change, when there are updates to the plan.

While proper employee training and prevention efforts can substantially mitigate fire risks, use of flames, oil and grease makes it difficult to fully fireproof restaurants.

Instituting a prevention plan and maintaining a clean, properly cared for working space minimizes these hazards.

Tips For maintaining kitchen exhaust maintenance

As a kitchen exhaust system owner, it is crucial to keep up and care for every piece of equipment that makes your business run properly. 

One of the most important pieces of equipment to maintenance and keep clean in an eatery is the kitchen exhaust system.

This is the one area that should never be neglected in any degree. Not only can a dirty kitchen hood and exhaust contaminate food and cut the quality of cooking, it can be a potential danger.

Grease fires, explosions, and smoke damage are among a few common hazards associated with unkempt kitchen hoods and exhausts.

To be sure this doesn’t happen to you or your beloved restaurant, catch up on tips to cleaning and maintaining your kitchen hood and exhaust equipment effectively.

Proper Maintenance for Kitchen Hoods and Kitchen Ducts, Vents.

Kitchen exhausts hoods need required maintenance schedule check-ups. Along with the kitchen exhaust vents, ducts require equal maintenance.

These areas should be cleaned and inspected every three to six months by a certified commercial cleaning company.

In fact, the NFPA 96 Fire Code mandates that all commercial kitchens have to be inspected by a qualified company.

Commercial cleaning companies keep the proper technologies, training, and knowledge to responsibly and reliably detect any dangerous issues or complications with your kitchen exhaust system.

Unfortunately, commercial kitchen fires are more common than you would think. According to the NFPA, more than 11,000 kitchen fires are reported every year. Regular cleaning and maintenance of commercial kitchen equipment is imperative to reducing these statistics.

Commercial Kitchen Hood and Exhaust Cleaning When a professional company comes in to service, inspect, and clean your restaurant kitchen, there are several places they will cover.

Areas such as deep fryers, grease traps, stoves, ovens, open grills, ductwork, and ventilation systems are all examined.

They will work to improve the kitchen’s airflow, keep up fire code compliance, ensure a safe working environment, and cut fire risks. This will keep you in compliance with the fire marshals, health inspectors, and insurance companies.

For more in-depth details call for a free consultation.

Contact us today 1-800.932.1969

Adrian home severely damaged by kitchen fire, pet killed – 13abc.com Toledo (OH) News, Weather and Sports

A more than 100 year old home on Greenly Street in Adrian is likely a total loss after a Sunday morning fire.

Fire officials say the call cam in shortly after 10 a.m.  They were able to get the blaze under control in around 90 minutes, but not before the home was severely damaged.

It appears the fire started in the kitchen, then spread to the attic inside the walls. No one was home at the time and the house was locked.

Firefighters forced their way and found that four pets were inside the home. Two cats escaped without injury, but one dog was badly burned and another dog died.

The Fire Cheif says the house sustained $50,000 to $60,000 worth of damage, which will likely exceed the poperty value of the home.

The fire is not considered suspicious.

via Adrian home severely damaged by kitchen fire, pet killed – 13abc.com Toledo (OH) News, Weather and Sports.

In Compliance With NFPA 96

A RECENT NFPA 101®, LIFE SAFETY CODE®, committee meeting for healthcare occupies included a discussion about when cooking operations should be required to be protected.

The conversation was triggered by a proposal for the 2015 edition of the code that would allow portable cooking devices in certain areas in nursing homes.

In a larger sense, the discussion was a continuation of the many changes made to the 2012 Life Safety Code that allow health care occupies, particularly nursing homes, to become more residential, or homelike, for residents.

The changes included allowing limited items in corridors, allowing residential or commercial cooking for 30 or fewer persons to be open to the corridor, and other major amendments.

The new proposed changes include allowing devices such as microwave ovens, hot plates, and electric skillets for reheating and limited cooking.

Subsection 9.2.3 of the Life Safety Code covers commercial cooking equipment and references NFPA 96, Ventilation Control and Fire Protection of Commercial Cooking Equipment. It is important to note that both documents use the term “commercial cooking equipment.

The scope of NFPA 96 states that it applies to both public and private cooking operations, including residential cooking equipment used for commercial purposes, though it does not apply to cooking equipment located in a single dwelling unit. The scope also excludes cooking where only residential equipment is used, a fire extinguisher is located in the kitchen, the facility is not an assembly occupancy, and the authority having jurisdiction has approved the installation.

An annex note to the scope further states that the judgment should include consideration of the items being cooked, the type of cooking — for example, deep fat frying versus oven baking — and frequency of cooking.

The annex also states that this standard applies to “… all other auxiliary or ancillary components or systems that are involved in the capture, containment, and control of grease-laden cooking effluent” and includes examples of operations that may not require compliance with NFPA 96, such as daycare centers that warm bottles and lunches, therapy cooking in health care occupies, and others.

The Life Safety Code also allows limited cooking in certain occupies. Typically, the limitations are that the equipment be a residential type and that it only be used for food warming or limited cooking. Such provisions are found in Chapters 15 and 16 for new and existing day care facilities, and Chapters 20 and 21 for new and existing ambulatory health care.

For other occupies, the code includes provisions permitting cooking operations that are not protected in accordance with NFPA 96 where it is outdoor equipment, portable equipment that is not flue-connected, or equipment that is used only to warm food.

The bottom line is that not all cooking operations require protection in accordance with NFPA 96, which does not address cooking equipment but rather the quantity of grease-laden vapors produced and whether that quantity is sufficient to warrant protection.

If the requirements of NFPA 96 do apply to cooking operations producing grease-laden effluent, then the Type I (liquid tight) hood and exhaust duct and the fixed extinguishing system are required. However, there are many cases where only food warming or limited cooking are done, and NFPA 96 requirements are not applicable.

 

Start Hood Cleaning Business

Financial freedom, job security, adjustable work hours; Are these important to you? 

Consider cleaning kitchen exhaust hood systems.

Are you looking for a trade that allows you to set which days & hours you work?

Do you want to pick whom work for? How much you charge? Kitchen hood cleaning give you these opportunity’s.

In America, everyday 10′s of 1000′s of pounds of combustible grease accumulate on restaurant kitchen exhaust hood systems.

These hood exhaust systems need to have this combustible grease removed. Grease causes fires, so this service is considered fire prevention, it is not just janitorial!

When you do the job right, you are a fire prevention specialist. Every year 1000′s of restaurants and millions of dollars are lost to fire.

Doing quality work, you can quickly build a reputation of consistent and dependable service.

This will put you in even greater demand. Because the cleaning has to be done when the cooking operations are shut down, many kitchens are done at night.

But many kitchens close during some part of the day, others are not open on certain days.

You can choose which jobs you want and when. Most work can be adjusted anywhere over the course of a month.

To do it right you will need quality training, a power washer and reliable transportation.

Each of these aspects can work to your advantage to create the sort of job you are looking for. One that fits your life style.

For over 30 years Kitchen Exhaust Cleaning Consulting has been involved in commercial kitchen Hood Cleaning. If you want to know more about Kitchen Exhaust hood cleaning.

For more in-depth details call for a free consultation.

Contact us today 1-800.932.1969