Tag Archives: nfpa 96 code regulation

Flames coming through rooftop vents Fire damages downtown Greenville restaurant

The fire at Wild Wing Cafe in downtown Greenville was reported at 9:23 a.m., according to the Greenville Fire Department.

Flames coming through rooftop vents were visible from offices across the street.  The restaurant is in the same block as Barley’s Tap Room, Trappe Door and Luna Rosa.

Greenville Fire Battalion chief Richard Mullinax said the fire broke out in the kitchen in a ruptured gas line in the cooking area.   He said firefighters had to delay briefly until the gas was cut off.  He said once they were able to get inside to fight the fire, it was out within 8 to 10 minutes.

Mullinax said the common attics shared by businesses in the older downtown buildings pose a challenge for firefighters, but in this case, the fire was limited to Wild Wings.  He said Barley’s and other businesses may have some odor of smoke, but should likely be able to operate normally once the fire fighting operation is completed.

Trappe Door and Barley’s will both be open as usual Wednesday by happy hour.

Mullinax said that Wild Wing will be closed for repairs because there is smoke and water damage because the sprinkler system went off and helped keep the fire contained.

West Washington Street was closed between South Main and Richardson streets.

Adrian home severely damaged by kitchen fire, pet killed – 13abc.com Toledo (OH) News, Weather and Sports

A more than 100 year old home on Greenly Street in Adrian is likely a total loss after a Sunday morning fire.

Fire officials say the call cam in shortly after 10 a.m.  They were able to get the blaze under control in around 90 minutes, but not before the home was severely damaged.

It appears the fire started in the kitchen, then spread to the attic inside the walls. No one was home at the time and the house was locked.

Firefighters forced their way and found that four pets were inside the home. Two cats escaped without injury, but one dog was badly burned and another dog died.

The Fire Cheif says the house sustained $50,000 to $60,000 worth of damage, which will likely exceed the poperty value of the home.

The fire is not considered suspicious.

via Adrian home severely damaged by kitchen fire, pet killed – 13abc.com Toledo (OH) News, Weather and Sports.

In Compliance With NFPA 96

A RECENT NFPA 101®, LIFE SAFETY CODE®, committee meeting for healthcare occupies included a discussion about when cooking operations should be required to be protected.

The conversation was triggered by a proposal for the 2015 edition of the code that would allow portable cooking devices in certain areas in nursing homes.

In a larger sense, the discussion was a continuation of the many changes made to the 2012 Life Safety Code that allow health care occupies, particularly nursing homes, to become more residential, or homelike, for residents.

The changes included allowing limited items in corridors, allowing residential or commercial cooking for 30 or fewer persons to be open to the corridor, and other major amendments.

The new proposed changes include allowing devices such as microwave ovens, hot plates, and electric skillets for reheating and limited cooking.

Subsection 9.2.3 of the Life Safety Code covers commercial cooking equipment and references NFPA 96, Ventilation Control and Fire Protection of Commercial Cooking Equipment. It is important to note that both documents use the term “commercial cooking equipment.

The scope of NFPA 96 states that it applies to both public and private cooking operations, including residential cooking equipment used for commercial purposes, though it does not apply to cooking equipment located in a single dwelling unit. The scope also excludes cooking where only residential equipment is used, a fire extinguisher is located in the kitchen, the facility is not an assembly occupancy, and the authority having jurisdiction has approved the installation.

An annex note to the scope further states that the judgment should include consideration of the items being cooked, the type of cooking — for example, deep fat frying versus oven baking — and frequency of cooking.

The annex also states that this standard applies to “… all other auxiliary or ancillary components or systems that are involved in the capture, containment, and control of grease-laden cooking effluent” and includes examples of operations that may not require compliance with NFPA 96, such as daycare centers that warm bottles and lunches, therapy cooking in health care occupies, and others.

The Life Safety Code also allows limited cooking in certain occupies. Typically, the limitations are that the equipment be a residential type and that it only be used for food warming or limited cooking. Such provisions are found in Chapters 15 and 16 for new and existing day care facilities, and Chapters 20 and 21 for new and existing ambulatory health care.

For other occupies, the code includes provisions permitting cooking operations that are not protected in accordance with NFPA 96 where it is outdoor equipment, portable equipment that is not flue-connected, or equipment that is used only to warm food.

The bottom line is that not all cooking operations require protection in accordance with NFPA 96, which does not address cooking equipment but rather the quantity of grease-laden vapors produced and whether that quantity is sufficient to warrant protection.

If the requirements of NFPA 96 do apply to cooking operations producing grease-laden effluent, then the Type I (liquid tight) hood and exhaust duct and the fixed extinguishing system are required. However, there are many cases where only food warming or limited cooking are done, and NFPA 96 requirements are not applicable.