Tag Archives: exhaust hood cleaning

Cleaning Kitchen Restaurant Exhaust Fan

sheila Shine after power washing kitchen hood cleaning

Start Restaurant Hood Cleaning Business

Start a Hood Cleaning Business

  • It Is Required By the National Fire Protection Association.
  • (NFPA 96)
  • It Is Repeat Business.
  • Mandated by Authority having Jurisdiction.
  • Health Dept in your State, County, Town.

NFPA 96 Code 11.6.1 Requires It.

11.6.1 Upon inspection, if the exhaust system is found to be contaminated with deposits from grease-laden vapors, the contaminated portions of the exhaust system shall be cleaned by a properly trained, qualified, and certified person(s) acceptable to the authority having jurisdiction.

NFPA 96 Fire Code 4.1.5 states:

“The responsibility for inspection, maintenance, and cleanliness of the ventilation control and fire protection of the commercial cooking operations shall ultimately be that of the owner of the system, provided that this responsibility has not been             transferred in written form to a management company, tenant, or other party.”

NFPA 96 Fire Code 11.4 states:

11.4 – Inspection for Grease Buildup. The entire exhaust system shall be inspected for grease buildup by a properly trained, qualified, and certified company or person(s) acceptable to the authority having jurisdiction and in accordance with Table 11.4

Kitchen Exhaust System Cleaning – Hood Cleaning, Exhaust Fan Install/Repairs, Access Doors, Install Hinge Kit, Grease Containment, Commercial Kitchen Cleaning is better than any other contracting type of work because it is a necessity.

The grease is flammable has to be removed, using de-greaser and hot water under pressure to thoroughly clean kitchen exhaust system.

If a system is inspected by a Fire Marshal and found to have too much grease he will order them to have it cleaned or face fines.

According to the National Fire Protection Association Standard 96 the hood system needs to be cleaned by a properly trained and certified professional.

One major reason for this is so that restaurant owners do not send their own people in to clean it because it is unlikely to get cleaned effectively.

Another reason is so that unqualified people generally, even contractors, don’t attempt to clean it when they haven’t been properly trained-certified.

What this means for you is that if you are a certified professional, your Company can be the one who cleans it.

It’s Repeat Business

The NFPA 96 requires the grease to be cleaned regularly.

Type or Volume of Cooking Inspection Frequency
Systems serving solid fuel cooking operations Monthly
Systems serving high-volume cooking operations, such as 24-hour cooking, charbroiling, or wok cooking Quarterly
Systems serving moderate-volume cooking operations Semiannually
Systems serving low-volume cooking operations, such as churches, day camps, seasonal businesses, or senior centers Annually

The NFPA requires that the grease gets cleaned with regular frequency to prevent dangerous buildup.

Depending on the volume of cooking (i.e. how busy the restaurant is) determines how frequently it should be inspected for grease buildup.

When the grease reaches 2000 microns it is time for a cleaning.

Most hood cleaning companies simply clean the system regularly according to this grease buildup, once per month, every three months, or every six months.

Nursing homes, schools, and churches some are once per year cleaning.

Kitchen Exhaust Hood System is required to be cleaned on a regular basis, this means repeat business for you.

Your service will be necessary even in a slow economy.

People will always continue to buy food even when the economy is slow.

Restaurants are not going away. In fact, they are steadily on the rise, popping up everywhere.

Now is a great time to get in the hood cleaning business. As long as people are eating, your service will be required and necessary.

That’s good business.

You Know Who and Where Your Customers are attracting Customers is simple the majority are looking for the services sooner or later.

In the contracting business, you never know where your next customer is going to come from.

Residents and commercial businesses will need contracting work from time to time, but you never know who, where, or when.

Kitchen Hood cleaning is the exact opposite. You know exactly who your customers are, Government, State, County, restaurants, schools, churches, nursing homes, hospitals, deli’s bakeries bagel places etc.

You know exactly where they are which makes it easy to get a list of them and begin going down that winning sales list with our internet marketing when you are ready.

More Info  1-800-932-1969

Protect your restaurant from a kitchen grease fire

One of the biggest threats to restaurant and bar owners is fire, which can be a costly and potentially business-ending disaster.

Grease accumulation, equipment malfunction and general poor housekeeping are all potential hazards.

From 2006 to 2010, an estimated average of 7,640 structure fires in restaurants and bars were reported to U.S. fire departments each year.

Associated average annual losses included two civilian deaths per year, 115 civilian injuries and $246 million in property loss, according to the National Fire Protection Agency.

Although 71 percent of restaurant and bar fires remain relatively small, they are no less damaging to business owners.

Loss of revenue, stress on staff and the cost of repairs make bouncing back an expensive task.

On top of this, owners run the risk of losing customers to competitors when “Closed” signs hang in the windows.

Preparation can make or break a business.

Almost all commercial cooking generates grease, which is a huge fire hazard to its highly combustible nature.

Because of this, there is really no way to completely erase the threat of fire.

However, there are precautions you can take to decrease the likelihood of a potentially catastrophic event.

Proper duct and hood cleaning.

Exhaust hoods and ducts are designed to collect cooking vapors and residues. Poorly cleaned kitchen hoods and ducts account for 21 percent of all fires.

The National Fire Protection Association’s fire code NFPA 96 prescribes the minimum fire safety guidelines for cooking equipment.

Kitchen exhaust hoods, grease removal devices, exhaust duct-work and all other components involved in the capture, containment and control of grease-laden cooking residue.

The NFPA 96 standards are considered necessary to offer an proper level of protection against damage to property and loss of life.

Restaurant owners must install a UL300-approved automatic fixed fire suppression system.

To protect their ducts, grease removal systems, hoods and commercial cooking equipment such as deep fat fryers, woks, ranges, griddles and broilers.

This system must be serviced every six months.

In addition to complying with fire, health and building codes, a professionally installed kitchen exhaust hood system helps keep up a clean, safe environment.

Commercial cooking generates grease-laden air and other pollutants. An adequately designed kitchen exhaust system is vital to maintaining good airflow.

Kitchen hoods should be made of and supported by steel or stainless that meets minimum thickness requirements.

Other approved materials of equal strength and fire corrosion resistance may also be used.

NFPA 96 recommends that kitchen hood and duct cleaning frequency be based on an individual restaurant or bar’s cooking volume:

Monthly – For systems serving solid fuel cooking operations

Quarterly – For systems with high-volume cooking operations such as 24-hour cooking, charbroiling or wok cooking operations

Semi-annually – For systems serving moderate-volume cooking operations

Annually – For systems serving low-volume cooking

Grease filters are the first line of removal for grease-laden vapors.

Clean filters improve ventilation and cut the fire hazard significantly. Filters should be cleaned on a weekly basis for moderate- to high-volume cooking operations.

Empowering employees.

Employee fire safety and response training should include a fire prevention plan and an emergency action plan.

Is a powerful defense against fire threats and can mean the difference between a localized fire and an uncontrolled blaze.

Fire prevention plan.

In addition to basic fire training and an action plan, hands on training can offer a better understanding of fighting fires.

Employees should also be familiar with personal protective equipment and fire evacuation routes and should have real training in using a fire extinguisher.

A basic fire prevention plan should include.

A list of all major fire hazards, proper handling and storage rules for hazardous materials, and potential ignition sources.

Procedures to control the accumulation of flammable and combustible waste material. Procedures for regular maintenance of safeguards installed on heat-producing equipment.

Names or job titles of employees responsible for maintaining equipment

Emergency action plan.

A well-developed emergency action plan should give employees with basic training on what to do in the event of a fire.

Employers should check the emergency action plan:

When the plan is developed, when the employee’s responsibilities or designated actions under the plan change, when there are updates to the plan.

While proper employee training and prevention efforts can substantially mitigate fire risks, use of flames, oil and grease makes it difficult to fully fireproof restaurants.

Instituting a prevention plan and maintaining a clean, properly cared for working space minimizes these hazards.

Flames coming through rooftop vents Fire damages downtown Greenville restaurant

The fire at Wild Wing Cafe in downtown Greenville was reported at 9:23 a.m., according to the Greenville Fire Department.

Flames coming through rooftop vents were visible from offices across the street.  The restaurant is in the same block as Barley’s Tap Room, Trappe Door and Luna Rosa.

Greenville Fire Battalion chief Richard Mullinax said the fire broke out in the kitchen in a ruptured gas line in the cooking area.   He said firefighters had to delay briefly until the gas was cut off.  He said once they were able to get inside to fight the fire, it was out within 8 to 10 minutes.

Mullinax said the common attics shared by businesses in the older downtown buildings pose a challenge for firefighters, but in this case, the fire was limited to Wild Wings.  He said Barley’s and other businesses may have some odor of smoke, but should likely be able to operate normally once the fire fighting operation is completed.

Trappe Door and Barley’s will both be open as usual Wednesday by happy hour.

Mullinax said that Wild Wing will be closed for repairs because there is smoke and water damage because the sprinkler system went off and helped keep the fire contained.

West Washington Street was closed between South Main and Richardson streets.