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Fire reported in Harlingen McDonalds : News : ValleyCentral.com

Authorities responded to the scene of a fire in at the fast food restaurant in Harlingen after a grill caught on fire.

Witnesses told Action 4 News that a grill in the kitchen of the restaurant on the 600 block of Sunshine 77 caught on fire around 10:50 a.m.

Employees reportedly attempted to put out the flames with a fire extinguisher, but called the Harlingen Fire Department as the fire continued.

Customers and employees also evacuated the fast food restaurant.

Witnesses said three fire trucks arrived at the scene to battle the flames inside McDonalds.

No injuries were reported from the fire.

It caused an estimated $2 million in damage Grantville Restaurant fire still under investigation, state police say

State police continue to investigate the cause of a fire that destroyed the Grantville Restaurant in East Hanover Township.

Trooper Rob Hicks, a state police official, said Thursday there was no new information to release on the Dec. 30 fire.

It caused an estimated $2 million in damage, Hicks said before. The intense fire also reached four alarms and required a response from firefighters in various parts of Dauphin County.

via Grantville Restaurant fire still under investigation, state police say | 

Flames coming through rooftop vents Fire damages downtown Greenville restaurant

The fire at Wild Wing Cafe in downtown Greenville was reported at 9:23 a.m., according to the Greenville Fire Department.

Flames coming through rooftop vents were visible from offices across the street.  The restaurant is in the same block as Barley’s Tap Room, Trappe Door and Luna Rosa.

Greenville Fire Battalion chief Richard Mullinax said the fire broke out in the kitchen in a ruptured gas line in the cooking area.   He said firefighters had to delay briefly until the gas was cut off.  He said once they were able to get inside to fight the fire, it was out within 8 to 10 minutes.

Mullinax said the common attics shared by businesses in the older downtown buildings pose a challenge for firefighters, but in this case, the fire was limited to Wild Wings.  He said Barley’s and other businesses may have some odor of smoke, but should likely be able to operate normally once the fire fighting operation is completed.

Trappe Door and Barley’s will both be open as usual Wednesday by happy hour.

Mullinax said that Wild Wing will be closed for repairs because there is smoke and water damage because the sprinkler system went off and helped keep the fire contained.

West Washington Street was closed between South Main and Richardson streets.

Tips For maintaining kitchen exhaust maintenance

As a kitchen exhaust system owner, it is crucial to keep up and care for every piece of equipment that makes your business run properly. 

One of the most important pieces of equipment to maintenance and keep clean in an eatery is the kitchen exhaust system.

This is the one area that should never be neglected in any degree. Not only can a dirty kitchen hood and exhaust contaminate food and cut the quality of cooking, it can be a potential danger.

Grease fires, explosions, and smoke damage are among a few common hazards associated with unkempt kitchen hoods and exhausts.

To be sure this doesn’t happen to you or your beloved restaurant, catch up on tips to cleaning and maintaining your kitchen hood and exhaust equipment effectively.

Proper Maintenance for Kitchen Hoods and Kitchen Ducts, Vents.

Kitchen exhausts hoods need required maintenance schedule check-ups. Along with the kitchen exhaust vents, ducts require equal maintenance.

These areas should be cleaned and inspected every three to six months by a certified commercial cleaning company.

In fact, the NFPA 96 Fire Code mandates that all commercial kitchens have to be inspected by a qualified company.

Commercial cleaning companies keep the proper technologies, training, and knowledge to responsibly and reliably detect any dangerous issues or complications with your kitchen exhaust system.

Unfortunately, commercial kitchen fires are more common than you would think. According to the NFPA, more than 11,000 kitchen fires are reported every year. Regular cleaning and maintenance of commercial kitchen equipment is imperative to reducing these statistics.

Commercial Kitchen Hood and Exhaust Cleaning When a professional company comes in to service, inspect, and clean your restaurant kitchen, there are several places they will cover.

Areas such as deep fryers, grease traps, stoves, ovens, open grills, ductwork, and ventilation systems are all examined.

They will work to improve the kitchen’s airflow, keep up fire code compliance, ensure a safe working environment, and cut fire risks. This will keep you in compliance with the fire marshals, health inspectors, and insurance companies.

For more in-depth details call for a free consultation.

Contact us today 1-800.932.1969

In Compliance With NFPA 96

A RECENT NFPA 101®, LIFE SAFETY CODE®, committee meeting for healthcare occupies included a discussion about when cooking operations should be required to be protected.

The conversation was triggered by a proposal for the 2015 edition of the code that would allow portable cooking devices in certain areas in nursing homes.

In a larger sense, the discussion was a continuation of the many changes made to the 2012 Life Safety Code that allow health care occupies, particularly nursing homes, to become more residential, or homelike, for residents.

The changes included allowing limited items in corridors, allowing residential or commercial cooking for 30 or fewer persons to be open to the corridor, and other major amendments.

The new proposed changes include allowing devices such as microwave ovens, hot plates, and electric skillets for reheating and limited cooking.

Subsection 9.2.3 of the Life Safety Code covers commercial cooking equipment and references NFPA 96, Ventilation Control and Fire Protection of Commercial Cooking Equipment. It is important to note that both documents use the term “commercial cooking equipment.

The scope of NFPA 96 states that it applies to both public and private cooking operations, including residential cooking equipment used for commercial purposes, though it does not apply to cooking equipment located in a single dwelling unit. The scope also excludes cooking where only residential equipment is used, a fire extinguisher is located in the kitchen, the facility is not an assembly occupancy, and the authority having jurisdiction has approved the installation.

An annex note to the scope further states that the judgment should include consideration of the items being cooked, the type of cooking — for example, deep fat frying versus oven baking — and frequency of cooking.

The annex also states that this standard applies to “… all other auxiliary or ancillary components or systems that are involved in the capture, containment, and control of grease-laden cooking effluent” and includes examples of operations that may not require compliance with NFPA 96, such as daycare centers that warm bottles and lunches, therapy cooking in health care occupies, and others.

The Life Safety Code also allows limited cooking in certain occupies. Typically, the limitations are that the equipment be a residential type and that it only be used for food warming or limited cooking. Such provisions are found in Chapters 15 and 16 for new and existing day care facilities, and Chapters 20 and 21 for new and existing ambulatory health care.

For other occupies, the code includes provisions permitting cooking operations that are not protected in accordance with NFPA 96 where it is outdoor equipment, portable equipment that is not flue-connected, or equipment that is used only to warm food.

The bottom line is that not all cooking operations require protection in accordance with NFPA 96, which does not address cooking equipment but rather the quantity of grease-laden vapors produced and whether that quantity is sufficient to warrant protection.

If the requirements of NFPA 96 do apply to cooking operations producing grease-laden effluent, then the Type I (liquid tight) hood and exhaust duct and the fixed extinguishing system are required. However, there are many cases where only food warming or limited cooking are done, and NFPA 96 requirements are not applicable.